Thursday, 22 June 2017

Questions about deleted item from USGS website

USGS high strangeness: A magnitude 6.8 Santa Barbara California reported by USGS for 29th of June which is NEXT WEEK? Deleted



22 June, 2017


At 2.00, pm UTC, this morning USGS delivered into my email box a full report of a major mag 6.8 quake in Santa Barbara California, I receive reports from USGS on all quakes of mag 6. or higher.

I clicked on the link provided and was somewhat surprised to find a page claiming 'EVENT DELETED,' curios, I went to Santa Barbara News on my computer for more information but the only report on quakes was from a mag 3. on June the 9th, nearly two weeks ago.

As for why USGS would report a major quake in California which never happened, I can't imagine, what they were thinking about? With such massive resources I can't understand why they would make such an error, which it obviously was.

What is even stranger was the fact the report for the major quake was on 29th of June which is 7 days into the future?


Have the United States Geological Survey altered historic data on their website so as not to panic the people as major quakes have risen by more than 400% since 1900? 

I have checked every major quake since 1900 on the USGS website once in 2014 and once again this year  and alarmingly over 1,800 quakes have been added since my initial findings...
See here


Arctic sea ice report: - 06/21/2017


Many thanks to Torstein Viddal.

Sea Surface Temperatures in the Northern Shelikhov Gulf are 14.3 °C / 57.7°F. 

The normal temperature should be 2.9°C / 37.2°F.


Arctic: 4.5m waves breaking ice


 

"IV [ Monday ] bomb cyclone that 963 pascals and falling"


http://forum.arctic-sea-ice.net/index.php/topic,1834.msg117889.html#msg117889

Sea Surface Temperatures in the Northern Shelikhov Gulf are 14.3 °C / 57.7°F. 



The normal temperature should be 2.9°C / 37.2°F.

The anomaly is 11.4°C / 20.5°F

Nullschool link: 
http://bit.ly/2tvwUwB



What did the landscape of Greenland look like in the past?


The absence of historical photos raises questions about changes in the landscape of Greenland since rapid climate change. What we do have gives a clue.

I would appreciate any information people can bring to bear on this.
The disappearance of snow and ice from Greenland


The footage of the landslide in Western Grennland that produced the tsunami the other day has brought up questions in my mind as to what this landscape would have looked like back in 1979.

I have learned that the altitude of the cliffs in this video is about 1000 feet and yet there seems to be less snow about than I would see on the Southern Alp in NZ in summer.




Is this normal?

The following is all that I could find to provide a historical perspective of what we would normally have expected without rapid warming

New details have emerged about the Greenland landslide that occurred in Karrat Fjord and the deadly tsunami it produced late Saturday (local time), June 17, 2017.








To tell whether the island’s glacial cap will melt away any time soon, researchers are poring over old pictures and drawings for clues to its past behaviour.

With Arctic temperatures rising faster than anywhere else on Earth, Greenland is now losing about 200 billion tonnes of ice per year and raising ocean levels around the globe. Projections suggest that melting from the island might swell sea levels by 30 centimetres by the end of this century. If all Greenland’s ice melted — a possibility over the next few centuries − it would push up sea level by more than 6 metres, enough to flood coastal megacities such as New York and Miami.

But the projections carry large uncertainties, in part because researchers lack basic information about Greenland’s past. Satellite data only go back 40 years, which is why Bjørk and his colleagues are poring over 180,000 photographs and other data that record how glaciers have advanced and retreated during cold and warm spells in the recent past. Their first sets of findings suggest that Greenland ice has responded more strongly to past climate changes than was previously realized. Now, the researchers are trying to unravel what factors within the oceans, atmosphere and inside glaciers control their behaviour




Nearly 4 million tons crashed into sea! - NEW details about the Greenland Tsunami



June 21, 2017: It was initially thought that the tsunami was created by a magnitude 4.0 earthquake with the epicenter (17.4 miles) north of the village of Nuugaatsiaq on the western coast of Greenland. However, reconnaissance flights performed by the Danish Joint Arctic Command on June 18 discovered a large landslide scar (approximately 985 x 3 600 feet, thus confirming that the cause of the tsunami was a landslide. Nearly 4 million tons of earth went crashing into the sea! 






ISIS' theatre of operations is moving to Europe


ISIS: Losing The Battle, But Winning The War

21 June, 2017



  • If ISIS is retreating in Mosul, it is rapidly advancing in Manchester. The Caliphate is winning its war in Europe. Six months ago in Britain, the rise of Jeremy Corbyn, the ultra-pacifist Labour party leader who blamed the "war on terror" for the recent attacks in Manchester and London, would have been unthinkable.

  • As the Caliphate razed to the ground everything in its path, Europe reacted as if that were just the result of regrettable manners that should not concern her. The Islamists, however, had other plans.

  • "Why, in August 2015, did ISIS need to blow up and destroy that temple of Baalshamin? Because it was a temple where pagans before Islam came to adore mendacious idols? No, it was because that monument was venerated by contemporary Westerners, whose culture includes an educated love for 'historical monuments' and a great curiosity for the beliefs of other people and other times. And Islamists want to show that Muslims have a culture that is different from ours, a culture that is unique to them". — Paul Veyne, archeologist.
The Islamic State is crumbling -- if too slowly. More than two years have passed since French President François Hollande promised, "We will bomb Raqqa". Sooner or later, ISIS will probably be reduced to a small enclave with no territorial continuity, and its chief, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, will be eliminated. It would, nevertheless, be most dangerous to dismiss these three years as a short parenthesis: Nazism did not last as long: "just" 12 years in power and five at war with the rest of Europe. The physical and cultural consequences of the Nazi tyranny are, unfortunately, still visible in Europe. The same will be said of the Islamic State. Three years of terror and conquests are not bad in for a war between the Caliphate vs. everyone else.

ISIS will leave behind an unprecedented terrorist infrastructure (277 Europeans killed on European soil in two years).
Infographic: Jihadist Arrests In The EU  | Statista

If ISIS is retreating in Mosul, it is rapidly advancing in Manchester. The Caliphate is winning its war in Europe. Six months ago in the Britain, the rise of Jeremy Corbyn, the ultra-pacifist Labour party leader who blamed the "war on terror" for the recent attacks in Manchester and London, would have been unthinkable. His success is clearly linked to the recent bloodshed in British streets.

Infographic: Terrorism in Europe in 2016 | Statista

In the West, ISIS has assailed parliaments in Ottawa, cafés in Copenhagen, beaches in Nice, social centers in San Bernardino, metros and airports in Brussels, music festivals in Manchester, theaters, sports stadiums, restaurants and kosher markets in Paris, churches in Rouen, Christmas markets in Berlin, malls in Stockholm. Not bad for a "JV team", as Barack Obama called the Caliphate.

ISIS has been an unparalleled attraction for the umma, the world community of the Islamic faithful: about 30,000 Muslims around the world -- 6,000 from Europe -- have left their homes to fight under the deadly black flag of the Caliph. ISIS was able to build a global network of terror. Jihadist groups such as Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis in Egypt, Abu Sayyaf in the Philippines, Ansar al-Sharia in Libya, Boko Haram in Nigeria, the Caucasus Emirate in Russia, and the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, along with others, have all pledged allegiance to ISIS. 

The Caliphate has also become the wealthiest terror group in history. Sebastian Gorka, a White House advisor on radical Islam,said: "The attacks of September 11, 2001, cost barely $500,000. ISIS makes that in six hours! Do you feel safe?"

ISIS has made evil viral. The world was stunned when ISIS submerged the Western imagination in the public executions of journalists, the massacres of captured troops, markets for sexual slavery, executions of gays, and public drownings, burning people alive and crucifixions. "Never before in history have terrorists had such easy access to the minds and eyeballs of millions", wrote Brendan Koerner, noting that "ISIS is winning the social media war". Often, evil works. A few weeks ago, in Paris, a Jewish woman, Sarah Halimi was killed by a Muslim shouting "Allahu Akbar". The case was barely covered by the mainstream press. Then several French intellectuals demand the authorities to denounce it as a case of anti-Semitism. ISIS's threats are now so intense that even academic experts of Islam, such as Gilles Kepel, are under police protection.

In a few months, the Islamic State cleared the historic colonial border of Sykes-Picotconquered half of Syria, destroyed entire cities of prices antiquities such as Palmyra, reached the periphery of Baghdad, and kicked out the Iraqi army, in which the United States had invested 25 billion dollars. That is why many counter-terrorism analysts are intelligently asking if "ISIS is winning".

ISIS's main legacy, however, is devastation -- both cultural and human. ISIS has been successful in making a blank slate, a sort of Islamic "year zero," in which, after an apocalypse, history will start again -- supposedly virgin and pure. The Caliphate will leave behind a Middle East more and more Islamic, not only in the landscape, but also in demography. ISIS swept away entire non-Muslim communities that will never return. Many Christian and Yazidi towns within its orbit will remain permanently empty due to the slaughter, the exile and the disappearance of survivors. The Islamic State has been able to destroy the ancient Christian community of Mosul.

A new study published in the weekly magazine Plos Medicine concluded that around 10,000 members of the ethnic and religious Yazidi minority were killed. The researchers estimated that 6,800 other Yazidis were kidnapped, with more than one third still missing.

"Christianity in Iraq is over", said Canon Andrew White, the great Anglican vicar of Baghdad. ISIS succeeded, for the first time in 2000 years, in cancelling Christian communion in Nineveh. Professor Amal Marogy, a native of Iraq, said, at a conference at the Hudson Institute, that while infrastructure such as the Mosul Dam can be saved from ISIS, the eradication of the Christian presence in Iraq means "the end of a peaceful civilization". There are commentators who are now noting that "ISIS wins when Christians leave the Middle East".

The jihadist recently vandalized ancient Roman statues and artifacts at the Syrian archaeological site of al-Salhiye, known as Dura Europos. ISIS devastated the most famous capitals of ancient Mesopotamia, from Nimrud to Hatra. "This destruction is unprecedented in recent history", according to Marina Gabriel, coordinator of the American Schools of Oriental Research Cultural Heritage Initiatives, an institute that tracks the destruction of Islamic State.

The Nimrud ziggurat, built almost 2900 years ago -- the most spectacular sacred structure known in ancient Mesopotamia -- does not exist anymore. ISIS terrorists devastated the Mosul Public Library, where 10,000 manuscripts were burned or stolen. ISIS also managed to erase of the entire Jewish history of Mosul, including the tombs of Jonah, Seth and Daniel. The Caliphate destroyed the first Assyrian city, Khorsabad. The greatest devastation, however, took place in Palmyra, the most important archaeological jewel of the Middle East. Palmyra delenda est. The Islamic State also eliminated thousands of years of Syrian and Iraqi history, pulverizing exquisite ancient treasures such as the temple of Bal.

As the Caliphate razed to the ground everything in its path, Europe reacted as if that were just the result of regrettable manners that should not concern her. The Islamists, however, had other plans. Professor Paul Veyne writes in his book on Palmyra:







"Why, in August 2015, did ISIS need to blow up and destroy that temple of Baalshamin? Because it was a temple where pagans before Islam came to adore mendacious idols? No, it was because that monument was venerated by contemporary Westerners, whose culture includes an educated love for 'historical monuments' and a great curiosity for the beliefs of other people and other times. And Islamists want to show that Muslims have a culture that is different from ours, a culture that is unique to them. They blew up that temple in Palmyra and have pillaged several archaeological sites in the Near East to show that they are different from us and that they don't respect what Western culture admires".

That is why, after Palmyra, the Islamic State attacked music halls and other Western symbols in Europe.


The "JV team" might be losing ground, but so far it is winning the war of civilizations. Will the West be able not only to free Raqqa and Mosul, but also to reverse this cultural avalanche trying to crush it?


Russian news analysis of American sanctions

Sanction Them All! The US Senate Wants Trump to Punish European Vassals Over Nord Stream 2 Pipeline


Vesti News


An outlook for Arctic sea ice

Summer solstice 2017 Sea Ice Outlook

A subjective comparison of 2017 worldview imagery for June 19 with 2012-2016




The "mystery" of Antarctic sea ice extent

Is it really such a mystery? Antarctic ice melted to unprecedented extent during the summer and has now returned to previous highs.

That seems to indicate that the ice must be thin (it acts in quite different from Arctic ice). 

We also know it is melting from below

ANTARCTIC SEA ICE HIT 35-YEAR RECORD HIGH

Antarctic sea ice has grown to a record large extent for a second straight year, baffling scientists seeking to understand why this ice is expanding rather than shrinking in a warming world.


Antarctic sea ice extent Sunday compared to 1979-2000 normal (NSIDC)
Antarctic sea ice extent on September 22 compared to 1981-2010 median depicted by orange curve (NSIDC)

On Saturday, the ice extent reached 19.51 million square kilometers, according to data posted on the National Snow and Ice Data Center Web site.  That number bested record high levels set earlier this month and in 2012 (of 19.48 million square kilometers). Records date back to October 1978.

(NSIDC)
(NSIDC)
The increasing ice is especially perplexing since the water beneath the ice has warmed, not cooled.
The overwhelming evidence is that the Southern Ocean is warming,” said Jinlun Zhang, a University of Washington scientist, studying Antarctic ice. “Why would sea ice be increasing? Although the rate of increase is small, it is a puzzle to scientists.”

In a new study in the Journal of Climate, Zhang finds both strengthening and converging winds around the South Pole can explain 80 percent of the increase in ice volume which has been observed.

The polar vortex that swirls around the South Pole is not just stronger than it was when satellite records began in the 1970s, it has more convergence, meaning it shoves the sea ice together to cause ridging,” the study’s press release explains. “Stronger winds also drive ice faster, which leads to still more deformation and ridging. This creates thicker, longer-lasting ice, while exposing surrounding water and thin ice to the blistering cold winds that cause more ice growth.”

But no one seems to have a conclusive answer as to why winds are behaving this way.
I haven’t seen a clear explanation yet of why the winds have gotten stronger,” Zhang told Michael Lemonick of Climate Central.

Some point to stratospheric ozone depletion, but a new study published in the Journal of Climate notes that computer models simulate declining – not increasing – Antarctic sea ice in recent decades due to this phenomenon (aka the ozone “hole”).

This modeled Antarctic sea ice decrease in the last three decades is at odds with observations, which show a small yet statistically significant increase in sea ice extent,”says the study, led by Colorado State University atmospheric scientist Elizabeth Barnes.





Rapid climate change in Antarctica

Worrying climate news, as a huge ice shelf melts, in Antarctica
  • Rain and significant ice melts in Antarctica surprised scientists
  • In the future, these events could cause ice to melt and break off, which would make sea levels rise


21 June, 2017


(CNN)Antarctica is experiencing weird weather, and the changes have some scientists worried about the future.

There’s an area on the west side of the icy continent called the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and last January, scientists found a 300,000-square-mile portion of its perimeter was melting. That’s an area roughly two times the size of California, covered in slush.

According to recent research published in Nature Communications, the melt was caused by an unusually strong El Niño event around January 2016.

A melt of this magnitude is relatively rare in Antarctica,” said Julien Nicolas, one of the paper’s authors at the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center. “There have been about three or four events of this size in the last 40 years.”

For more than two weeks in January 2016, a passive microwave satellite observed surface ice melt two times the size of California.

The news also is ominous for another reason: It means the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is essentially being melted from both sides. El Niños push warm water under the sheet. On top, colder westerly winds usually do enough to stave off any approaching warm weather, but in the 2016 incident, they didn’t.

This event also brought about another surprise for scientists: Rain.

We saw in our observations that there were some rain, we heard from some parties on the Ross Ice Shelf, and we saw it on the weather models,” Nicolas said. “That’s very unusual. We don’t have a record of rain in Antarctica, so we don’t know how often it’s happened in the past.”

Why it matters

Rain and slush would make for a miserable day anywhere, but the weird weather patterns observed over the two-week period in 2016 painted a potentially worrisome picture for the future.

If more extreme El Niños occur, ice shelves such as the Ross Ice Shelf on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet will melt and be weakened. Sometimes, those ice melts can lead to dramatic rivers and waterfalls that leak off of the ice structure. Take a look at a recent video [top of this post] of the Nansen Ice Shelf, which is north of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet



Arctic And Antarctic Sea Ice Is Now Melting At Alarming Rates